Allergy Or Irritant?

skin rash

The Truth About Your Rash

Skin rashes are common. Soaps, detergents, plants and other substances can trigger red, itchy skin. Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, says these types of rashes can be the result of an allergic reaction or an irritation. Knowing the difference is key to getting the right treatment.

Hand-washing is essential for preventing the spread of germs. But, sometimes, all this scrubbing can cause a rash. Does this mean you’re allergic to the soap?

“One important thing to differentiate from allergic contact dermatitis is irritant contact

dermatitis,” says Dr. Davis.Allergic dermatitis means a substance is causing an allergic reaction on your skin. But irritant contact dermatitis means your skin is inflamed from repeated exposure to something.

“For example, if I used lye soap on my skin, and I used it over and over again, I would develop an irritant contact dermatitis simply from eroding away the natural barrier of my skin with repetitive washing,” says Dr. Davis.

It’s not always easy to tell the difference between an allergy or irritant.

“So it’s very helpful to go to a health provider, to find the “real” cause of your rash,

Visit: Allergy Care Centers to test for 180 allergens. Call for an appointment today 702-331-5230.  Located in the Medical District, 400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas

Forget Allergy Shots We Prescribe Allergy Toothpaste

mother-and-daughter-brushing-teeth-together-picture-

Millions of Americans suffer from pet allergies that prevent them from enjoying the benefits of owning a dog or a cat. Ronnie Johnson is among them, but couldn’t bear the thought of having to give up her two cats.

“It was really bad,” Ronnie told us at Allergy Care Centers. “I was just itchy all the time and sneezing all the time. I was really uncomfortable and miserable.”

Joyce tried over-the-counter medications but couldn’t find relief. She consulted an allergist at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where a clinical trial involving immunotherapy toothpaste was taking place.

The toothpaste, called Allerdent, works to keep breath fresh and fight cavities while also offering the same benefits as an allergy shot or drops. Researchers found that applying the extracts found in a shot to the lining of a patient’s mouth worked just as well to alleviate symptoms.

“The patients who came in were treated for the very things that they were sensitive to, and that included indoor allergens, like dust mite and pet dander, as well as outdoor allergens such as tree pollen, grass pollen, ragweed pollen,” Dr. William Reisacher, an associate professor of otolaryngology and director of allergy services at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Ronnie, who lives in the Las Vegas, signed on for the year-long study that required six of the 12 volunteers to brush their teeth for two minutes using two pumps of the toothpaste in either the morning or night and the other six to use drops under their tongue. Volunteers using the toothpaste were also required to log their usage in a journal.

Both groups reported a significant decrease in their symptoms, including Joyce, who was in the toothpaste group.

Allerdent is not covered by insurance, meaning Joyce spends about $320.00 every three months but said the cost is worth it.

“I used to be so irritable because I was so uncomfortable,” Joyce said. “But now I don’t really feel allergy symptoms anymore.”

To find a prescribing doctor for Allerdent in your area or to find more information, visit Allergy Care Centers.

Allergy or Irritant? The Truth About Your Rash

Skin rashes are common. Soaps, detergents, plants and other substances can trigger red, itchy skin. Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, says these types of rashes can be the result of an allergic reaction or an irritation. Knowing the difference is key to getting the right treatment.

Hand-washing is essential for preventing the spread of germs. But, sometimes, all this scrubbing can cause a rash. Does this mean you’re allergic to the soap?

“One important thing to differentiate from allergic contact dermatitis is irritant contact dermatitis,” says Dr. Davis.

Allergic dermatitis means a substance is causing an allergic reaction on your skin. But irritant contact dermatitis means your skin is inflamed from repeated exposure to something.

“For example, if I used lye soap on my skin, and I used it over and over again, I would develop an irritant contact dermatitis simply from eroding away the natural barrier of my skin with repetitive washing,” says Dr. Davis.

It’s not always easy to tell the difference between an allergy or irritant.

“So it’s very helpful to go to a health provider, to find the “real” cause of your rash,

Visit: Allergy Care Centers to test for 180 allergens. Call for an appointment today 702-331-5230.  Located in the Medical District, 400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas

Happy Hour Meet & Greet

you are invited

Allergy Care Centers would like to invite the Las Vegas community  to a “Happy Hour Meet & Greet”

General Public-Business owners Wed. Oct.10th.

Medical/Healthcare Community- Tues. Oct. 9th.

 Preview our new Allergy Care Center and learn about our NEW technology in the testing and treatment of allergies.

Allergy Care Center can test for 180 SPECIFIC allergies

You deserve to know about our non-invasive single finger prick blood test and our easy, gentle customized toothpaste treatment.

Our mission is to make Las Vegas allergy free

Appetizers & treats will be served. There will be a drawing  for prizes

Appetizers & Treats

Appetizers

Presentation starts at 7:00 pm.

400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas, NV 89106 Telephone: 702-331-5230 RSVP to Hannah

Email: hannahs@allergycarecenters.org

Brush Away Your Allergies

My Allergy Medicine Stop Working?

allergy hey fever

When your allergies act up, do you reach for the same prescription or over-the-counter product that’s eased your symptoms in the past? What if it doesn’t work the same way now?

There’s a small chance your body has built up resistance to your favorite allergy medicine. It’s much more likely, though, says Neil Kao, MD, that what’s happening is due to some change in your life, your body, or your environment. Kao is an allergist with the Allergic Disease & Asthma Center in Greenville, SC.

Check out these possible culprits.

Your Location

Did you move recently or start a new job? Your new setting might fire up your allergies

Say you’ve moved across the country. You may be around plants you’ve never seen before. Or just moving from the country to the city can cause allergies to flare.

“Pollution such as diesel exhaust can intensify allergies,” says Jeffrey Demain, MD. He’s director of the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Center of Alaska. “If you live near an interstate or are spending more time on the road for work, your symptoms can get worse.”

Ask your doctor if you need to change your treatment. “If you’ve been taking antihistamines for years and they’re not working now,” Kao says, “talk to your doctor about something stronger, such as allergy shots.

More Pollen Days 

Warmer temperatures mean allergy season starts earlier and lasts longer. Plus, ragweed plants, one of the biggest reasons you sneeze in the fall, are growing faster and creating more pollen.

Allergy meds work best when you start them several weeks before the season. Now that allergy season is long, you’ll need to plan further ahead.

Demain says you should schedule a meeting with your allergist a few months before your allergies normally kick in.

 

New Allergies

Your symptoms could seem worse if your allergies change.

Perhaps you were just allergic to ragweed before. Now you have the one-two punch of ragweed and grass. Or maybe you have a new indoor allergy. For instance, you could have a reaction to mold or pet dander.

The result? You might need a stronger medicine.

Kao says the best way to find out what’s going on is to get a simple and inexpensive series of allergy tests. Once you know which allergens affect you, your doctor can come up with an effective medication plan.

Something Besides Allergies

Things like an inflammation in your sinuses or nasal polyps — tiny growths on the lining of your nose — could make your allergy symptoms worse, Demain says.

Your regular doctor, allergist, or an ENT doctor — that’s an ear, nose, and throat specialist — can diagnose and treat these conditions.

New Hope For Allergy Patients

New Hope For Allergy Patients

New Hope For Allergy Patients

Allergy patients no longer have to take those painful allergy shots.  New hope for allergy patients. There is a new allergy care center in Las Vegas that treats allergies with a customized toothpaste.

The toothpaste comes in berry or mint flavor and is very tasteful. you can choose between fluoride or non-fluoride. You brush your teeth one a day as usual.

No taking off work to go and get allergy shots or for children no missing school.

allergy shots

 

Allergy misery is on the rise right now, as are a few other colds and viruses.

If you want to target your treatment, you might need to separate a few symptoms you get from ragweed, mold and other weeds from what normally goes along with a few of these other illnesses already circulating.

With kids going back to school, the chances of illness are high.

Allergy specialists at the Cleveland Clinic say if it’s a cold or other virus or infection, chances are your symptoms will last usually a week or two. Allergy misery will likely start toward the end of the summer and the beginning of fall. It will most likely last for the next few months.

If your nose runs clear instead of a colored discharge, that’s also an allergy sign too.

Allergies also tend to not have a fever with respiratory problems, but rather a runny nose, scratchy throat, and itchy eyes.

If you don’t get relief from over-the-counter medication, you should see your health care provider.

Starting something stronger now, such as a nasal steroid, may help you all season, so you are not chasing symptoms.

A few lifestyle changes may be in order right now to avoid pollen, including closing windows and turning on air conditioning whenever possible. You also may want to shower before bedtime to try and remove allergens from your hair and body.

Don’t forget that pets can bring in what you are allergic to on their fur and feet, so

Another non-medicated way to find relief is to rinse your sinuses. Rinsing should be done with distilled water.

Is Ragweed dragging you down?

Ragweed

If ragweed has been dragging you down lately, doctors say you’re not alone.

Cooler temperatures are causing trees and weeds to pollinate earlier than usual

“This change in weather that we’ve had, really since August began has pushed the weeds to start pollinating early.

Allergy sufferers might find themselves reaching for over-the-counter relief early this year.

weeds don’t usually pollinate until fall arrives.

“They only perceive fall as fall because of the temperature change. and so that’s what they’re perceiving is that this is fall weather there are some preventative steps you can take.

First, leave your air conditioner running to keep air circulating, leave windows closed and sealed and keep your pets clean.

“Preferably, wash those once a week and keep them out of your bedroom.

Pollen counts also tend to be higher in the morning, so experts say to limit outdoor activities early in the day. Some exposure is inevitable, but an over the counter antihistamine or nasal spray should help your symptoms.

“If you have a lot of problems with nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, which are the typical problems or symptoms of allergies, you can certainly go over the counter.”

If your allergies are so severe they keep you from going to work or doing everyday activities, doctors say at that point, you should see a specialist.

Allergy Care Center here in Las Vegas can help you eliminate allergies altogether. With their new technology of testing and treating allergies, you will start to feel relieved in 30 days or sooner.

Are your allergies getting worse? Climate change may be to blame

Air Pollution

Red meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

Ewd meat

Red meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

Published
It has come to light that many people in the United States are allergic to red meat. A new study suggests that the immune response that it triggers may increase heart disease risk.

That red meat can be bad for our health is not news; red meat is the nutritional pariah of the 21st century, and not without good reason.

Now implicated in diabetesstrokecancer, and cardiovascular disease, it is certainly a foodstuff to eat in moderation — if at all.

Primarily, the levels of saturated fat in red meat are known to contribute to heart disease.

However, according to a recent study, some people are more at risk than others.

Perhaps surprisingly, this increased risk is due to a food allergen. The latest findings are published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

It was only relatively recently that the main allergen in red meat — a complex sugar called galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) — was identified.

Allergies and heart diseaseRed meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

For some time now, scientists have believed that allergies, in general, may set off an immunological chain reaction that leads to atherosclerosis, or a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries that hardens over time, narrowing the blood vessels.

However, the mechanisms that underpin this process are not understood.

In the new study, researchers at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville wanted to dig deeper.

So, they devised an experiment to investigate whether individuals with red meat allergies might be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and, if so, why.

To see whether or not there was a link, they assessed the blood samples of 118 Virginia residents for an antibody specific to alpha-gal.

The marker was found in 26 percent of the sampled participants. As they expected, people who were allergic to red meat were more likely to have increased levels of arterial plaques.

In fact, participants who were sensitive to alpha-gal had 30 percent more arterial plaque than those who did not mount an immune response.

Additionally, the plaques in allergic individuals were more unstable, making them more likely to cause heart attack and stroke.

“This novel finding from a small group of subjects from Virginia raises the intriguing possibility that allergy to red meat may be an under-recognized factor in heart disease.”

Study leader Dr. Colleen McNamara

Who is affected?

It is still not clear exactly how many people are allergic to red meat, but it is thought to be roughly 1 percent of the population. However, as much as 20 percent of certain populations may produce a lower level response to the allergen.

Interestingly, a bite from the Lone Star tick sensitizes people to alpha-gal, thereby making red meat allergies more common in the Southeastern states, where this tick resides.

At this stage, the link between red meat allergies and atherosclerosis is not set in stone; the team plans to continue investigating, using larger groups of participants.

Dr. McNamara notes, “These preliminary findings underscore the need for further clinical studies in larger populations from diverse geographic regions and additional laboratory work.”

Do You Suffer From Allergies?

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Eye Allergy SuffererDo you suffer from eye allergy

If you are an allergy sufferer, you probably recognize the symptoms of hay fever.  Do you suffer from allergies?  if so, These include itchy, burning, watery, red eyes. This reaction usually starts a short time after exposure to plant pollens, house dust, or animal dander.

When this reaction occurs in the eyes, it is called hay fever or allergic conjunctivitis. This conjunctivitis usually begins in young adulthood and affects you only during certain seasons of the year. Your vision will probably not be affected by this type of allergy. There are many treatment options that are now available to help provide comfort for allergy sufferers. Powerful new eye drops have come a long way in helping with allergy relief.

Eye allergies have become more prevalent in the past decade. At this time of year, it’s good to keep in mind some eye allergy tips. The best way to treat an allergy is to avoid or get rid of the allergen.

A simple artificial tear eye drop can help to wash out particles your eyes are reacting to. A tip is to keep your eye drops in the refrigerator. The cool eye drop will help to calm the itch. Another tip is frequent face washing to prevent allergens from seeping into your eyes. Allergy pills do not always help your eyes, so if needed, consult your eye doctor for recommendations of a good allergy eye drop.

Mast cells on the surface of the eye release histamine chemicals that cause allergy symptoms. These cells can rupture when you rub your eyes and release even more histamines. Therefore, even though your eyes are itching, rubbing them is not a good idea and will not help the allergy problem. Finally, eye itchiness can also be a sign of other conditions like dry eyes and blepharitis. Talk to your eye doctor if you are unsure what is causing your eye allergy symptoms.

What are the symptoms of allallergy hey feverergies in the eyes?

Symptoms of eye allergies include:
  • Red, irritated eyes.
  • Itchiness.
  • Tearing or runny eyes.
  • Swollen eyelids.
  • Soreness, burning, or pain.
  • Sensitivity to light.

Can you have an allergy in one eye?

The scenario for developing allergy symptoms and signs is much the same for the eyes as that for the nose. … Typically, both eyes are affected by an allergic reaction. Occasionally, only one eye is involved, particularly when only one eye is rubbed with an allergen, as this causes mast cells to release more histamine.

How do you get rid of eye allergies?

Consider the following remedies:
  1. Wash your face. Washing your face is one of the first things you should do to combat itchy, swollen eyes, says Ogbogu. …
  2. Rinse out the eyes. …
  3. Apply a cold compress. …
  4. Try allergy eye drops. …
  5. Take oral medications or get allergy shots. …
  6. Stay indoors.
  7. Before taking allergy shots, get tested to find out what you are allergy

Learn More

What foods cause eye allergies?

Eight things cause about 90% of food allergy reactions:
  • Milk (mostly in children)
  • Eggs.
  • Peanuts.
  • Tree nuts, like walnuts, almonds, pine nuts, brazil nuts, and pecans.
  • Soy.
  • Wheat and other grains with gluten, including barley, rye, and oats.
  • Fish (mostly in adults)
  • Shellfish (mostly in adults)

How long does it take for allergic conjunctivitis to go away?

With viral conjunctivitis, symptoms usually are worse beginning about three to five days after the eye infection begins. You may need eye drops containing decongestants or antihistamines to reduce irritation and swelling, sometimes for as long as one or two weeks.

Can allergies only affect your eyes?

If your eyes itch and are red, tearing or burning, you may have eye allergies(allergic conjunctivitis), a condition that affects millions of Americans. Many people will treat their nasal allergy symptoms but ignore their itchy, red, watery eyes.

Learn More

What causes eye allergies?

It causes the eyes to become red, watery, and itchy. Although pink eye and eye allergies cause similar symptoms, they are two distinct conditions. Eye allergies are caused by an adverse immune reaction to certain substances, such as dust or pollen. Pink eye, however, is caused by eye allergies as well as other factors

What kind of allergy causes eyes to swell?

When you have allergies, your body reacts to things that aren’t really harmful, like pollen, dust mites, mold, or pet dander. It releases histamine, a chemical that causes swelling and inflammation. The blood vessels in your eyes swell and your eyes get red, teary, and itchy.

ALLERGY 101

An allergy is a reaction of your immune system to something that, for most people, is essentially harmless, such as pet dander, nuts, or pollen. For most seasonal allergy sufferers, the diagnosis is hay fever, or—as your doctor would write it down in your medical chart—allergic rhinitis. Reactions range from annoying—sneezing, itching, watery eyes, stuffy nose—to dangerous: in some people, allergies can trigger asthma attacks.

Seasonal allergies afflict up to 30 percent of the world’s human population, studies have found, and the Cleveland Clinic reports a rising allergy prevalence. For most people, allergies aren’t life-threatening, but they can hamper one’s enjoyment of life—for months at a stretch. Tree pollen strikes in the spring, grass pollen in the summer, and weed pollen in the summer and fall.

Visit our Allergy Center 

400 Shadow Land, Suite 202

Las Vegas, NV 89106

(702) 331-5230

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Seasonal Allergies or Cold?- Allergy Care Centers

Posted on June 4, 2018  in allergy testing

 How do you tell the difference between seasonal allergies and a cold? allergy hey fever

A. It is not easy to tell seasonal allergies apart from a respiratory tract infection or the common cold.

You may have been treated for sinusitis or bronchitis in the past with not much benefit.

Symptoms can be the same for both seasonal allergies and a cold and may include a runny nose, nasal congestion, sore throat, and cough.

Understanding Allergies

Allergies kick in when your immune system overreacts to normally harmless substances called allergens. Your body releases a chemical called histamine, and you start to experience a variety of symptoms.

If you get these symptoms at the same time of year each year, and those symptoms linger for weeks on end, then it might be seasonal allergies.

If a trial treatment of allergy medications such as oral antihistamines and steroid nasal sprays helps to shorten the duration of your symptoms, then you are probably on the right track and should consider allergy testing.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment  702.331.5230

 

For more information about the latest treatment and care for allergies