Allergy and asthma triggers you can find at your kid’s school

Allergy and asthma triggers

If your child has come home this past month with the sniffles – it may not be a cold. At school, they may be exposed to allergens and irritants not found at home. Symptoms of allergen exposure can include a runny nose, congestion, sneezing, watery eyes, itchy nose, itchy eyes, cough, and even asthma attacks.

Here are some possible allergy and asthma triggers to keep in mind:

  • Cockroaches and mice. Droppings and protein dust from these critters can be found in schools and classrooms. These allergens tend to be seen at higher levels in urban schools.
  • Classroom pets. Children can be allergic to hamsters, guinea pigs, mice, rats, chicks and rabbits, some of the more common classroom pets. Any furry animal may trigger symptoms. In addition, kids who live in households with dogs, cats, and other animals carry pet hair and dander into school on their clothing.
  • Exposure can be outdoors and indoors throughout the school year. Some amount of indoor mold is normal, but there can be increased amounts when there is high indoor humidity, standing water, or water damage.
  • Recess, physical education, and outdoor activities. Vigorous indoor or outdoor play can trigger symptoms such as a cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, or chest tightness in children with asthma. This time of year, kids with seasonal allergies may be exposed to ragweed and other weed pollens that can trigger allergies and asthma. In the outdoor environment, pollution can trigger asthma symptoms as well, especially if the school is located near busy roads.
  • Chalkdust. Chalk residue is more of an irritant than an allergy but can cause nose, eye, and asthma symptoms just the same. It helps these days that chalkboards are less common in classrooms and whiteboards are being used instead.

If you notice your child has developed allergy symptoms since starting school, an allergist can do testing to help identify triggers and offer advice on treatment. If your child has a school-based trigger, allergy medication during the school day or treatment with allergy shots, also called allergen immunotherapy, can help. Making changes in the environment to avoid the allergen can help, too. This may include decreasing exposure to pets, keeping windows closed, and making sure the environment is not overly humid.

For children with asthma, allergic triggers and exercise may cause symptoms to flare. Children with asthma should have rescue medication such as an inhaler and an asthma action plan available to them at school. For some children, their doctor may recommend the use of rescue medication prior to gym class or recess as a preventive measure. Younger kids may be less verbal about how they’re feeling, so be sure to review your child’s asthma action plan with school staff.

For children with food allergies, being back to school can cause anxiety. If you haven’t by now, review your child’s food allergy action plan with school staff. Children with food allergies who have been prescribed epinephrine autoinjectors should have two unexpired devices available to them at all times. These may be stored at the nurse’s office or sometimes, older children may self-carry their medications based on the school’s policy. Discuss snack time and classroom celebrations with your child and their teacher ahead of time. You may need to send snacks to school for your child to eat during a celebration. Most schools have policies designed to help protect children with allergies and will partner with you to ensure your child has a healthy and safe school year.

Hillary Gordon, MD, is a pediatric allergist who practices at Nemours/Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, at Nemours sites in Concordville, PA and on the Thomas Jefferson University campus in Philadelphia.

Posted: October 1, 2018 – 9:41 AM

Hillary Gordon, MD, For Philly.com

Allergy Care Centers test for 180 allergens-47 food allergens 

Food Allergy Testing

food allergy testing

The prevalence of food allergies increased by 70 percent in U.S. kids younger than 18 between 1997 and 2016

Doing the month of October 2018, we are offering 20% off on office visits. Schedule appointment today. Mention “Peanut Allergy” at the front disk when you arrive at our office to receive your 20% discount. 

Allergies should be distinguished from food intolerance

Food intolerance and food Allergy is not the same thing. Allergy is characterized by an acute reaction, the most severe form of which is anaphylactic shock.

Food intolerance is a hypersensitivity non-allergic nature in respect of any product or beverage, which can manifest health disorders of different severity.

An Allergy is a hyperactive response of the immune system to certain substances (allergens) that normally do not have any pathological actions. At the first contact with the allergen the body produces specific antibodies (IgE). Repeated contact with the allergen leads to the release of special cells of the skin and mucous membranes of biologically active substances (heparin, serotonin, etc.) and development of clinical manifestations.

The symptoms depend on the type of allergen: e.g., Allergy to a substance that is found in inhaled air (dust, pollen), manifestations affect the respiratory system: a cough, runny nose and other symptoms. When you eat the allergen in the first place there is a reaction on the part of the gastrointestinal tract: pain in the abdomen, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

The most common symptoms of food allergies are:
– lacrimation;
– skin rash;
– itching;
– cough and the complicated breath;
– swelling of the tongue, neck, lips, face;
– runny nose;
– abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting;
– General weakness.

Food intolerance is more gradual in development and is not associated with the hyperactivity of the immune system and its symptoms more severe than those of food allergies. Intolerance problems often have the appropriate background: infectious inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, toxic effects of drugs, a low production of enzymes, hypersensitivity to preservatives, etc.

The immune system is not involved in the inflammatory process, but the symptoms in this overlap with symptoms of other diseases and not be able to supply the physician’s direct diagnosis. Nausea, malaise, flatulence, dizziness, weakness, etc. – only part of the possible consequences of intolerance to the product.

Many people, feeling light stable ailment, regard their condition as “normal” and do not think about intolerance.

LEARN MORE

Allergy Or Irritant?

skin rash

The Truth About Your Rash

Skin rashes are common. Soaps, detergents, plants and other substances can trigger red, itchy skin. Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, says these types of rashes can be the result of an allergic reaction or an irritation. Knowing the difference is key to getting the right treatment.

Hand-washing is essential for preventing the spread of germs. But, sometimes, all this scrubbing can cause a rash. Does this mean you’re allergic to the soap?

“One important thing to differentiate from allergic contact dermatitis is irritant contact

dermatitis,” says Dr. Davis.Allergic dermatitis means a substance is causing an allergic reaction on your skin. But irritant contact dermatitis means your skin is inflamed from repeated exposure to something.

“For example, if I used lye soap on my skin, and I used it over and over again, I would develop an irritant contact dermatitis simply from eroding away the natural barrier of my skin with repetitive washing,” says Dr. Davis.

It’s not always easy to tell the difference between an allergy or irritant.

“So it’s very helpful to go to a health provider, to find the “real” cause of your rash,

Visit: Allergy Care Centers to test for 180 allergens. Call for an appointment today 702-331-5230.  Located in the Medical District, 400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas

Forget Allergy Shots We Prescribe Allergy Toothpaste

mother-and-daughter-brushing-teeth-together-picture-
Brush Away Your Allergies

Millions of Americans suffer from pet allergies that prevent them from enjoying the benefits of owning a dog or a cat. Ronnie Johnson is among them, but couldn’t bear the thought of having to give up her two cats.

“It was really bad,” Ronnie told us at Allergy Care Centers. “I was just itchy all the time and sneezing all the time. I was really uncomfortable and miserable.”

Joyce tried over-the-counter medications but couldn’t find relief. She consulted an allergist at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where a clinical trial involving immunotherapy toothpaste was taking place.

The toothpaste, called Allerdent, works to keep breath fresh and fight cavities while also offering the same benefits as an allergy shot or drops. Researchers found that applying the extracts found in a shot to the lining of a patient’s mouth worked just as well to alleviate symptoms.

“The patients who came in were treated for the very things that they were sensitive to, and that included indoor allergens, like dust mite and pet dander, as well as outdoor allergens such as tree pollen, grass pollen, ragweed pollen,” Dr. William Reisacher, an associate professor of otolaryngology and director of allergy services at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Ronnie, who lives in the Las Vegas, signed on for the year-long study that required six of the 12 volunteers to brush their teeth for two minutes using two pumps of the toothpaste in either the morning or night and the other six to use drops under their tongue. Volunteers using the toothpaste were also required to log their usage in a journal.

Both groups reported a significant decrease in their symptoms, including Joyce, who was in the toothpaste group.

Allerdent is not covered by insurance, meaning Joyce spends about $320.00 every three months but said the cost is worth it.

“I used to be so irritable because I was so uncomfortable,” Joyce said. “But now I don’t really feel allergy symptoms anymore.”

To find a prescribing doctor for Allerdent in your area or to find more information, visit Allergy Care Centers.

Allergy or Irritant? The Truth About Your Rash

Skin rashes are common. Soaps, detergents, plants and other substances can trigger red, itchy skin. Dr. Dawn Davis, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, says these types of rashes can be the result of an allergic reaction or an irritation. Knowing the difference is key to getting the right treatment.

Hand-washing is essential for preventing the spread of germs. But, sometimes, all this scrubbing can cause a rash. Does this mean you’re allergic to the soap?

“One important thing to differentiate from allergic contact dermatitis is irritant contact dermatitis,” says Dr. Davis.

Allergic dermatitis means a substance is causing an allergic reaction on your skin. But irritant contact dermatitis means your skin is inflamed from repeated exposure to something.

“For example, if I used lye soap on my skin, and I used it over and over again, I would develop an irritant contact dermatitis simply from eroding away the natural barrier of my skin with repetitive washing,” says Dr. Davis.

It’s not always easy to tell the difference between an allergy or irritant.

“So it’s very helpful to go to a health provider, to find the “real” cause of your rash,

Visit: Allergy Care Centers to test for 180 allergens. Call for an appointment today 702-331-5230.  Located in the Medical District, 400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas

Happy Hour Meet & Greet

you are invited

Allergy Care Centers would like to invite the Las Vegas community  to a “Happy Hour Meet & Greet”

General Public-Business owners Wed. Oct.10th.

Medical/Healthcare Community- Tues. Oct. 9th.

 Preview our new Allergy Care Center and learn about our NEW technology in the testing and treatment of allergies.

Allergy Care Center can test for 180 SPECIFIC allergies

You deserve to know about our non-invasive single finger prick blood test and our easy, gentle customized toothpaste treatment.

Our mission is to make Las Vegas allergy free

Appetizers & treats will be served. There will be a drawing  for prizes

Appetizers & Treats

Appetizers

Presentation starts at 7:00 pm.

400 Shadow Lane, Suite 202, Las Vegas, NV 89106 Telephone: 702-331-5230 RSVP to Hannah

Email: hannahs@allergycarecenters.org

Brush Away Your Allergies

My Allergy Medicine Stop Working?

allergy hey fever

When your allergies act up, do you reach for the same prescription or over-the-counter product that’s eased your symptoms in the past? What if it doesn’t work the same way now?

There’s a small chance your body has built up resistance to your favorite allergy medicine. It’s much more likely, though, says Neil Kao, MD, that what’s happening is due to some change in your life, your body, or your environment. Kao is an allergist with the Allergic Disease & Asthma Center in Greenville, SC.

Check out these possible culprits.

Your Location

Did you move recently or start a new job? Your new setting might fire up your allergies

Say you’ve moved across the country. You may be around plants you’ve never seen before. Or just moving from the country to the city can cause allergies to flare.

“Pollution such as diesel exhaust can intensify allergies,” says Jeffrey Demain, MD. He’s director of the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Center of Alaska. “If you live near an interstate or are spending more time on the road for work, your symptoms can get worse.”

Ask your doctor if you need to change your treatment. “If you’ve been taking antihistamines for years and they’re not working now,” Kao says, “talk to your doctor about something stronger, such as allergy shots.

More Pollen Days 

Warmer temperatures mean allergy season starts earlier and lasts longer. Plus, ragweed plants, one of the biggest reasons you sneeze in the fall, are growing faster and creating more pollen.

Allergy meds work best when you start them several weeks before the season. Now that allergy season is long, you’ll need to plan further ahead.

Demain says you should schedule a meeting with your allergist a few months before your allergies normally kick in.

 

New Allergies

Your symptoms could seem worse if your allergies change.

Perhaps you were just allergic to ragweed before. Now you have the one-two punch of ragweed and grass. Or maybe you have a new indoor allergy. For instance, you could have a reaction to mold or pet dander.

The result? You might need a stronger medicine.

Kao says the best way to find out what’s going on is to get a simple and inexpensive series of allergy tests. Once you know which allergens affect you, your doctor can come up with an effective medication plan.

Something Besides Allergies

Things like an inflammation in your sinuses or nasal polyps — tiny growths on the lining of your nose — could make your allergy symptoms worse, Demain says.

Your regular doctor, allergist, or an ENT doctor — that’s an ear, nose, and throat specialist — can diagnose and treat these conditions.

New Hope For Allergy Patients

New Hope For Allergy Patients

New Hope For Allergy Patients

Allergy patients no longer have to take those painful allergy shots.  New hope for allergy patients. There is a new allergy care center in Las Vegas that treats allergies with a customized toothpaste.

The toothpaste comes in berry or mint flavor and is very tasteful. you can choose between fluoride or non-fluoride. You brush your teeth one a day as usual.

No taking off work to go and get allergy shots or for children no missing school.

allergy shots

 

Allergy misery is on the rise right now, as are a few other colds and viruses.

If you want to target your treatment, you might need to separate a few symptoms you get from ragweed, mold and other weeds from what normally goes along with a few of these other illnesses already circulating.

With kids going back to school, the chances of illness are high.

Allergy specialists at the Cleveland Clinic say if it’s a cold or other virus or infection, chances are your symptoms will last usually a week or two. Allergy misery will likely start toward the end of the summer and the beginning of fall. It will most likely last for the next few months.

If your nose runs clear instead of a colored discharge, that’s also an allergy sign too.

Allergies also tend to not have a fever with respiratory problems, but rather a runny nose, scratchy throat, and itchy eyes.

If you don’t get relief from over-the-counter medication, you should see your health care provider.

Starting something stronger now, such as a nasal steroid, may help you all season, so you are not chasing symptoms.

A few lifestyle changes may be in order right now to avoid pollen, including closing windows and turning on air conditioning whenever possible. You also may want to shower before bedtime to try and remove allergens from your hair and body.

Don’t forget that pets can bring in what you are allergic to on their fur and feet, so

Another non-medicated way to find relief is to rinse your sinuses. Rinsing should be done with distilled water.

Is Ragweed dragging you down?

Ragweed

If ragweed has been dragging you down lately, doctors say you’re not alone.

Cooler temperatures are causing trees and weeds to pollinate earlier than usual

“This change in weather that we’ve had, really since August began has pushed the weeds to start pollinating early.

Allergy sufferers might find themselves reaching for over-the-counter relief early this year.

weeds don’t usually pollinate until fall arrives.

“They only perceive fall as fall because of the temperature change. and so that’s what they’re perceiving is that this is fall weather there are some preventative steps you can take.

First, leave your air conditioner running to keep air circulating, leave windows closed and sealed and keep your pets clean.

“Preferably, wash those once a week and keep them out of your bedroom.

Pollen counts also tend to be higher in the morning, so experts say to limit outdoor activities early in the day. Some exposure is inevitable, but an over the counter antihistamine or nasal spray should help your symptoms.

“If you have a lot of problems with nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, which are the typical problems or symptoms of allergies, you can certainly go over the counter.”

If your allergies are so severe they keep you from going to work or doing everyday activities, doctors say at that point, you should see a specialist.

Allergy Care Center here in Las Vegas can help you eliminate allergies altogether. With their new technology of testing and treating allergies, you will start to feel relieved in 30 days or sooner.

Are your allergies getting worse? Climate change may be to blame

Air Pollution

Red meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

Ewd meat

Red meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

Published
It has come to light that many people in the United States are allergic to red meat. A new study suggests that the immune response that it triggers may increase heart disease risk.

That red meat can be bad for our health is not news; red meat is the nutritional pariah of the 21st century, and not without good reason.

Now implicated in diabetesstrokecancer, and cardiovascular disease, it is certainly a foodstuff to eat in moderation — if at all.

Primarily, the levels of saturated fat in red meat are known to contribute to heart disease.

However, according to a recent study, some people are more at risk than others.

Perhaps surprisingly, this increased risk is due to a food allergen. The latest findings are published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

It was only relatively recently that the main allergen in red meat — a complex sugar called galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) — was identified.

Allergies and heart diseaseRed meat allergy may increase heart disease risk

For some time now, scientists have believed that allergies, in general, may set off an immunological chain reaction that leads to atherosclerosis, or a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries that hardens over time, narrowing the blood vessels.

However, the mechanisms that underpin this process are not understood.

In the new study, researchers at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville wanted to dig deeper.

So, they devised an experiment to investigate whether individuals with red meat allergies might be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and, if so, why.

To see whether or not there was a link, they assessed the blood samples of 118 Virginia residents for an antibody specific to alpha-gal.

The marker was found in 26 percent of the sampled participants. As they expected, people who were allergic to red meat were more likely to have increased levels of arterial plaques.

In fact, participants who were sensitive to alpha-gal had 30 percent more arterial plaque than those who did not mount an immune response.

Additionally, the plaques in allergic individuals were more unstable, making them more likely to cause heart attack and stroke.

“This novel finding from a small group of subjects from Virginia raises the intriguing possibility that allergy to red meat may be an under-recognized factor in heart disease.”

Study leader Dr. Colleen McNamara

Who is affected?

It is still not clear exactly how many people are allergic to red meat, but it is thought to be roughly 1 percent of the population. However, as much as 20 percent of certain populations may produce a lower level response to the allergen.

Interestingly, a bite from the Lone Star tick sensitizes people to alpha-gal, thereby making red meat allergies more common in the Southeastern states, where this tick resides.

At this stage, the link between red meat allergies and atherosclerosis is not set in stone; the team plans to continue investigating, using larger groups of participants.

Dr. McNamara notes, “These preliminary findings underscore the need for further clinical studies in larger populations from diverse geographic regions and additional laboratory work.”